MIcah True AKA Caballo Blanco Dies of Cardiomyopathy

I have been under a rock lately, focusing on all the wrong things lately, work and associated issues that arise out of too much of it to notice the passing of Micah True. I only recently became aware of the enigmatic man and I found him to be inspirational and of great interest. He apparently died of Cardiomyopathy.

Below are some links to articlse about his life and what happened…RIP

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/21/sports/caballo-blancos-last-run-the-micah-true-story.html?_r=1&pagewanted=all

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2012/05/19/the-final-run-of-ultra-marathoner-micah-true.html

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Interval Training Helps Cardiac Patients

Found via twitter @icycleoc who RT @ironheartracing via @runnersworld

Article from Runnersworld.com ©Runnersworld.com

By Meghan G. Loftus

In a new study out of McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, researchers have found that completing 20-minute sessions of cycling intervals–with one minute at 90 percent maximum heart rate, one minute rest, repeated 10 times–significantly boosts overall health and fitness, even in patients with cardiovascular disease.

The New York Times reports:

It might seem counterintuitive that strenuous exercise would be productive or even wise for cardiac patients. But so far none have experienced heart problems related to the workouts, [lead researcher Dr. Maureen] MacDonald said. “It appears that the heart is insulated from the intensity” of the intervals, she said, “because the effort is so brief.”

Almost as surprising, the cardiac patients have embraced the routine. Although their ratings of perceived exertion, or sense of the discomfort of each individual interval, are high and probably accurate, averaging a 7 or higher on a 10-point scale, they report enjoying the entire sessions more than longer, continuous moderate exercise, Dr. MacDonald said.

“The hard work is short,” she points out, “so it’s tolerable.” Members of a separate, exercise control group at the rehab center, assigned to complete standard 30-minute moderate-intensity workout sessions, have been watching wistfully as the interval trainers leave the lab before them. “They want to switch groups,” she said.

The American Heart Association recommends 30 minutes of continuous, moderate exercise five times a week, but this study indicates that 20 minutes of interval training is as beneficial and possibly more enjoyable. And, obviously, the interval workouts are shorter. The majority of Americans who don’t exercise say it’s because they don’t have time.

If you’re in the minority–that is, you do have time for prolonged, moderate exercise–you shouldn’t abandon your current regimen. This type of exercise also has proven heath benefits. But on days when you’ve got to squeeze in a workout, intervals may be the way to go.

Do or Do Not. There is No Try!

The Coach Gives Me SomeTough Love!

On Tuesday I saw my cardiologist (Dr.K) for my quarterly blood work results-which I was too busy to do the prior 9 months. One things I love about Dr.K is she always starts my visit with “What’s new?” or “Tell me how things are going?” You may say she is just being polite but having been to going to her for the last 3 1/2 -4 years I can assure you this is part of the treatment I receive. For the most part my appointments last 30-60+ minutes, usually 3/4 of time is talking about how my life is going and how I deal with it. We never even look at the blood work results until we discuss the factors that ultimately effect them. This time I started with a sigh and said “It doesn’t get much worse”…her response “Tell me what’s going on with you?”. Now, I do my best to be in the moment and happy as much as possible and while I have been feeling very low about life in general (money,work etc…) I’m never visually depressed, unhappy or fail to find laughter through the days but I gave her quite a dump of excuses, emotions and reasons why life “doesn’t get much worse”.

Dr. K is from New york and has a bit of that city’s flavor to her but she is also very sweet, caring and ultimately there for her patients. So, basically she called me out for any excuse I had for not working out, not eating correctly, not doing what I know I should be doing in regards to how I live my life and handle stress. Sort of like a coach at half time pumping up his team – calling out the errors and missed opportunities and motivating and reinforcing how not to make those mistakes and get my head back in the game, “You already have the answers and know what to do you just need to do it.” is what she said. At first I didn’t like hearing it – I know what I need to do I don’t need someone else telling me- 10-15 minutes into the discussion I realized I need this. I’m not a huge Star Wars fan but her statement to me of “There is no try, just do” (reference to Yoda’s “Do or do not, there is no try”) was spot on.

I wish more doctors especially cardiologist treated the whole person more…because somedays you just need to have someone call you out!

What kind of treatment to you get? What does your doc do or don’t do you’d like to see more or less of? Do you prefer just the facts or also want a coach at your visits?

Eric

Yale Heart Study & Huffingtonpost 49th Annual American Heart Month

Today marks the beginning of the 49th annual American Heart Month.

THE YALE HEART STUDY is partnering with THE HUFFINGTON POST to spread awareness about cardiovascular disease. The Yale Heart Study is writing a blog-a-day for the Huffington Post. Read our first blog of the month “Tall, Dark, Handsome and Not Likely to Die of Heart Failure.” And look forward to the 28 more blogs to come!

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/suzanne-omalley/heart-month_b_1240546.html#s650948&title=Coffee_Too_Tall

36 Interesting Facts About The Human Heart

Here is a link to the actual artical from Randomhistory.com © 2011, RandomHistory.com

  1. The average adult heart beats 72 times a minute; 100,000 times a day; 3,600,000 times a year; and 2.5 billion times during a lifetime.f
  2. Though weighing only 11 ounces on average, a healthy heart pumps 2,000 gallons of blood through 60,000 miles of blood vessels each day.c
  3. A kitchen faucet would need to be turned on all the way for at least 45 years to equal the amount of blood pumped by the heart in an average lifetime.a
  4. The volume of blood pumped by the heart can vary over a wide range, from five to 30 liters per minute.e
  5. Every day, the heart creates enough energy to drive a truck 20 miles. In a lifetime, that is equivalent to driving to the moon and back.a
  6. Because the heart has its own electrical impulse, it can continue to beat even when separated from the body, as long as it has an adequate supply of oxygen.c
  7. The fetal heart rate is approximately twice as fast as an adult’s, at about 150 beats per minute. By the time a fetus is 12 weeks old, its heart pumps an amazing 60 pints of blood a day.g
  8. The heart pumps blood to almost all of the body’s 75 trillion cells. Only the corneas receive no blood supply.
  9. During an average lifetime, the heart will pump nearly 1.5 million gallons of blood—enough to fill 200 train tank cars.a
  10. Five percent of blood supplies the heart, 15-20% goes to the brain and central nervous system, and 22% goes to the kidneys.a
  11. The “thump-thump” of a heartbeat is the sound made by the four valves of the heart closing.a
  12. The heart does the most physical work of any muscle during a lifetime. The power output of the heart ranges from 1-5 watts. While the quadriceps can produce 100 watts for a few minutes, an output of one watt for 80 years is equal to 2.5 gigajoules.a
  13. The heart begins beating at four weeks after conception and does not stop until death.g
  14. A newborn baby has about one cup of blood in circulation. An adult human has about four to five quarts which the heart pumps to all the tissues and to and from the lungs in about one minute while beating 75 times.g
  15. The heart pumps oxygenated blood through the aorta (the largest artery) at about 1 mile (1.6 km) per hour. By the time blood reaches the capillaries, it is moving at around 43 inches (109 cm) per hour.g
  16. Early Egyptians believed that the heart and other major organs had wills of their own and would move around inside the body.d
  17. An anonymous contributor to the Hippocratic Collection (or Canon) believed vessel valves kept impurities out of the heart, since the intelligence of man was believed to lie in the left cavity.f
  18. Plato theorized that reasoning originated with the brain, but that passions originated in the “fiery” heart.f
  19. The term “heartfelt” originated from Aristotle’s philosophy that the heart collected sensory input from the peripheral organs through the blood vessels. It was from those perceptions that thought and emotions arose.f
  20. Prolonged lack of sleep can cause irregular jumping heartbeats called premature ventricular contractions (PVCs).b
  21. Some heavy snorers may have a condition called obtrusive sleep apnea (OSA), which can negatively affect the heart.b
  22. Cocaine affects the heart’s electrical activity and causes spasm of the arteries, which can lead to a heart attack or stroke, even in healthy people.a
  23. Galen of Pergamum, a prominent surgeon to Roman gladiators, demonstrated that blood, not air, filled arteries, as Hippocrates had concluded. However, he also believed that the heart acted as a low-temperature oven to keep the blood warm and that blood trickled from one side of the heart to other through tiny holes in the heart.f
  24. Galen agreed with Aristotle that the heart was the body’s source of heat, a type of “lamp” fueled by blood from the liver and fanned into spirituous flame by air from the lungs. The brain merely served to cool the blood.f
  25. In 1929, German surgeon Werner Forssmann (1904-1979) examined the inside of his own heart by threading a catheter into his arm vein and pushed it 20 inches and into his heart, inventing cardiac catheterization, a now common procedure.f
  26. On December 3, 1967, Dr. Christiaan Barnard (1922-2001) of South Africa transplanted a human heart into the body of Louis Washansky. Although the recipient lived only 18 days, it is considered the first successful heart transplant.e
  27. “Atrium” is Latin for “entrance hall,” and “ventricle” is Latin for “little belly.”a
  28. A woman’s heart typically beats faster than a man’s. The heart of an average man beats approximately 70 times a minute, whereas the average woman has a heart rate of 78 per minute.b
  29. Blood is actually a tissue. When the body is at rest, it takes only six seconds for the blood to go from the heart to the lungs and back, only eight seconds for it to go the brain and back, and only 16 seconds for it to reach the toes and travel all the way back to the heart.c
  30. French physician Rene Laennec (1781-1826) invented the stethoscope when he felt it was inappropriate to place his ear on his large-buxomed female patients’ chests.f
  31. Physician Erasistratus of Chios (304-250 B.C.) was the first to discover that the heart functioned as a natural pump.f
  32. In his text De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem, the father of modern anatomy, Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564), argued that the blood seeped from one ventricle to another through mysterious pores.f
  33. Galen argued that the heart constantly produced blood. However, William Harvey’s (1578-1657) discovery of the circulation system in 1616 revealed that there was a finite amount of blood in the body and that it circulated in one direction.f
  34. The right atrium holds about 3.5 tablespoons of blood. The right ventricle holds slightly more than a quarter cup of blood. The left atrium holds the same amount of blood as the right, but its walls are three times thicker.g
  35. Grab a tennis ball and squeeze it tightly: that’s how hard the beating heart works to pump blood.a
  36. In 1903, physiologist Willem Einthoven (1860-1927) invented the electrocardiograph, which measures electric current in the heart.e

— Posted January 28, 2010

References

a Avraham, Regina. 2000. The Circulatory System. Philadelphia, PA: Chelsea House Publishers.

b Chilnick, Lawrence. 2008. Heart Disease: An Essential Guide for the Newly Diagnosed. Philadelphia, PA: Perseus Books Group.

c Daniels, Patricia, et. al. 2007. Body: The Complete Human. Washington, D.C.: National Geographic Society.

d Davis, Goode P., et. al. 1981. The Heart: The Living Pump. Washington D.C.: U.S. News Books.

e The Heart and Circulatory System. 2000. Pleasantville, NY: The Reader’s Digest Association, Inc.

f Parramon’s Editorial Team. 2005. Essential Atlas of Physiology. Hauppauge, NY: Barron’s Educational Series, Inc.

g Tsiaras, Alexander. 2005. The InVision Guide to a Healthy Heart. New York, NY: HarperCollins Publishers.

Rider site regarding VT and ARVD/C

Just got this post from Craig who was responding to another rider story(https://heartattackrider.wordpress.com/2009/03/18/anyone-with-arrhythmogenic-right-ventricular-dysplasi-rvd-who-rides-a-bike/#comments). Here is what Craig says on his site “My name is Craig Cook. In March of 2008 I was diagnosed with idiopathic ventricular tachycardia, a potentially fatal heart arrhythmia. I was fit and healthy, having spent a good part of my adult life as an elite cyclist, much of it racing in Europe. This blog is about my condition, the things that might have led to it, and the course of treatment I am on. It is written as a resource for other endurance athletes who might have arrhythmias.”

Thanks for the post Craig and posting about your health experiences.

Hi Eric,

Strange we haven’t crossed each other’s path in the blogosphere. My (very un-updated blog) discusses my adventures with VT and a non-genetic form of ARVD/C… you and your readers may be interested. I will update soon, currently in my final weeks in grad school, then freedom, and time. I still train – 8-10hrs a week, no competition until some issues get figured 0ut (occassional VT = zaps by the ICD)… http://v-tach.blogspot.com/ Nice effort on your blog, keep up the good work.

Best, Craig

http://v-tach.blogspot.com