Do or Do Not. There is No Try!

The Coach Gives Me SomeTough Love!

On Tuesday I saw my cardiologist (Dr.K) for my quarterly blood work results-which I was too busy to do the prior 9 months. One things I love about Dr.K is she always starts my visit with “What’s new?” or “Tell me how things are going?” You may say she is just being polite but having been to going to her for the last 3 1/2 -4 years I can assure you this is part of the treatment I receive. For the most part my appointments last 30-60+ minutes, usually 3/4 of time is talking about how my life is going and how I deal with it. We never even look at the blood work results until we discuss the factors that ultimately effect them. This time I started with a sigh and said “It doesn’t get much worse”…her response “Tell me what’s going on with you?”. Now, I do my best to be in the moment and happy as much as possible and while I have been feeling very low about life in general (money,work etc…) I’m never visually depressed, unhappy or fail to find laughter through the days but I gave her quite a dump of excuses, emotions and reasons why life “doesn’t get much worse”.

Dr. K is from New york and has a bit of that city’s flavor to her but she is also very sweet, caring and ultimately there for her patients. So, basically she called me out for any excuse I had for not working out, not eating correctly, not doing what I know I should be doing in regards to how I live my life and handle stress. Sort of like a coach at half time pumping up his team – calling out the errors and missed opportunities and motivating and reinforcing how not to make those mistakes and get my head back in the game, “You already have the answers and know what to do you just need to do it.” is what she said. At first I didn’t like hearing it - I know what I need to do I don’t need someone else telling me- 10-15 minutes into the discussion I realized I need this. I’m not a huge Star Wars fan but her statement to me of “There is no try, just do” (reference to Yoda’s “Do or do not, there is no try”) was spot on.

I wish more doctors especially cardiologist treated the whole person more…because somedays you just need to have someone call you out!

What kind of treatment to you get? What does your doc do or don’t do you’d like to see more or less of? Do you prefer just the facts or also want a coach at your visits?

Eric

Atenolol & Riding Articles

Below are links to reader questions & forum topics regarding riding after a heart attack and/or while taking Atenolol, Hypertension or Blood Pressure medications.

“Heart Rate Monitors and Heart Attacks” (reader takes Atenolol) • cycling.co.uk

“Anyone Taking Atenolol for High Blood Pressure?” Bikeforums.com

“Hypertension / Blood Pressure Medications? If you’re taking what’s yours?” Bike Forums.com

Beta Blockers Q & A indoorcycleinstructor.com

This will be and ongoing process, if you know of any others please fee free to contact me.

More Exercise May Provide Greater Gains in Heart Disease

Taken from http://www.clevelandclinicmeded.com/news/Article.aspx?AID=626959&visitfrom=twitter

Overweight patients with heart disease saw better gains compared to standard cardiac rehab.

THURSDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) — A program featuring greater amounts of exercise and energy expenditure may be preferable to standard cardiac rehabilitation exercise in overweight patients with coronary heart disease, according to research published online May 11 in Circulation.

Philip A. Ades, M.D., of the University of Vermont College of Medicine in Burlington, and colleagues analyzed data from 74 overweight individuals — mean age of 64 years and mean body mass index of 32 — with coronary heart disease. Patients were randomized to high-calorie-expenditure exercise (3,000 to 3,500 calories weekly) or standard cardiac rehabilitation exercise (700 to 800 calories weekly).

At five months, the researchers found that those in the high-expenditure group had twice the weight loss (8.2 versus 3.7 kilograms) and fat mass loss (5.9 versus 2.8 kilograms). This group also had larger decreases in insulin resistance, total to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, and elements of the metabolic syndrome. No exercise-related cardiac events were noted, and adherence to the interventions was good, the authors write.

“Considering the negative consequences and increasing prevalence of obesity and metabolic syndrome, high-calorie-expenditure exercise training, combined with a hypocaloric diet, should be considered the exercise approach of choice for overweight patients with coronary heart disease,” the authors conclude. “Some individuals with no exercise experience whatsoever may initially benefit from a standard cardiac rehabilitation exercise protocol and then gradually evolve to four to six sessions per week as they improve their fitness.”

Last Updated: May 14, 2009

Abstract

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Anyone with arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasi, RVD, who rides a bike?

This is a message from Chris D who askes:

Hi; I have been looking on the web to talk to people with heart issues who cycle still or in the past. I heard Paul Sherwin describe Haydens durin the TOC and have been on the web looking since. I get the Riki thing he shared however he is younger and likely with much less scar tissue etc… I do not doubt Riki and will likely try it. question, does anyone else know what other treatments he went through; meds etc…. I told the Doc his story and She said that he is is taking great risk regardless of Riki and any meds etc…. I have been a cyclist since I can remember . Over the past 6-8 years I have experienced fatigue issues and lightheadedness and poor results but I fought through and thinking I could get back to the Level; but I never have come back and now just ride with a slower group and not with the bigboys here. I had no idea that I had this condition like Hayden Roulsten arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasi. That is until I stood up one morning after breakfast and hit the floor like Ali did Fraizer. a VTAC type arrhythmia slowed blood flow to the brain and I went out. The good news is my family say what happened and forced me to go to the hospital. Whereas before I would have chalked it up to over training and poor recovery nutrition etc… After many days in and out of the hospital and Dr’s office’s; Cardiac Ablation and Meds (BetaPace)(Toprol). Another Ablation procedure is in the table and if that fails and my ejection fraction remains low then it is a Defibrillator…great. My question is this: Do people ride moderately on Betapace? Can one at least spin for leisure and fitness still? I have the same question to anyone with cycling experience and defibulators? And improve fitness level? My Doc saiy no riding….I mean this hurts me like nothing else Cycling is ingrained into my life and family I fear losing the ability to stay involved… The question is real here and I do not ask anyone to play Doctor. I have heard it all from them and understand the risks from their perspective. However I feel like my definition of exertion is different than theirs and I know they are not the least bit athletic aerobically…. I am not in denial; just looking to learn and live on the bike again regards